Harry Potter and the International Order of Copyright: Should Tanya Grotter and the Magic Double Bass be banned?

“Rowling’s ability to stop the Potter pretenders is largely a function of the new regime of international copyright. Until recently, countries varied considerably in how they protected literary works, especially works from abroad. The United States, for instance, has a long history of providing less protection than the Europeans. Benjamin Franklin was a kind of pirate: He did good business as a printer of unlicensed English writing. In the 19th century, the United States generally refused to recognize foreign copyrights, allowing American readers to get the latest Dickens and Doyle cheaply. And the borrowing of characters itself has a longer tradition.” Tim WuHarry Potter and the International Order of Copyright: Should Tanya Grotter and the Magic Double Bass be banned? (Slate)