1

Guerilla Improv: No Joking Zone

Agent Marks and I were uncertain how to end it, but thankfully, our undercover agents came to our rescue. They mounted a joke insurgence and effectively re-took the NJZ. It started off with each undercover agent coming into the zone, one after another, telling jokes in a town-crier fashion. –Guerilla Improv: No Joking Zone (Improv-Abilities) A great piece of activist anti-comedy. If more people did this, we could just walk out…

Something about Interactive Fiction

In my review of Once and Future, I made the erroneous statement -”Just like video killed the radio star, graphics killed the parser,” and embarrassingly called interactive fiction a “dead genre.” I was wrong. Five years after I typed those lines, interactive fiction games continue to be produced, even commercially. –Terrence Bosky –Something about Interactive Fiction (Moby Games)

2

The Real and the Semi-Real

A member of a WOW guild suffered a stroke in real life and died. Her guildmates, knowing her only through the game, but nevertheless wanting to offer some remembrance for one of their own, decided to hold a memorial service in the game. A rival guild decided that would be a great time to show up and kill everyone. Hilarity ensued. Now, is it sort of creepy and vaguely sad…

2

Navigating Whitewater

Worried that I would not like him, my victim had used his humor to engage me, to make me laugh, to join in his witty barbs, and because I did like him, I had joined in. But we were not on equal footing and my comments contained a much more powerful threat because I did not have to like him, and he knew it. –Amy L. Wink –Navigating Whitewater (Inside Higher…

Student's Novel Faces Plagiarism Controversy

A recently-published novel by Harvard undergraduate Kaavya Viswanathan ’08, “How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Life,” contains several passages that are strikingly similar to two books by Megan F. McCafferty — the 2001 novel “Sloppy Firsts” and the 2003 novel “Second Helpings.” [...] Little, Brown signed Viswanathan to a two-book, $500,000 contract while she was in high school. This is the first book that the Harvard…