Noah Wardrip-Fruin and Pat Herrigan: First Person. New Media as Story, Performance, and Game

This allows us to see the underlying problem of digital game studies: ‘narratologists’ and ‘ludologists’ alike would rather be fragged to bits than make a negative value judgement. The reason for this is to be found in the history of game studies: once upon a time, videogames were only taken seriously by psychologists. They would lock up a 14-year-old to play Street Fighter II for 48 hours straight, submit him…

The Scientist on Camera

The archetype of the mad scientist was Rotwang in Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1926). Played by Rudolf Klein-Rogge, Rotwang had unruly hair, a disabled hand, and obsessive research interests. He worked alone, and although he lived in a modern city that his inventions made function, he was like a 16th-century alchemist. –The Scientist on Camera (Slate) Hmm… While Old Rossum and Young Rossum only appear in dialogue in RUR (Rossum’s Universal Robots),…

Lost in 'Lost': Devoted 'Lost' fans try to decode hit TV show's symbolism

Millman, whose essay is called “Game Theory,” sees “Lost’s” structure attracting fans via familiarity: She thinks it works like an interactive video game. “The story line and the action develop on multiple levels. There are hidden clues that function like the Easter eggs in gaming,” says Millman. “‘Lost” is a big game, and the act of watching it forces you to play along.” –Lost in ‘Lost': Devoted ‘Lost’ fans try…