DHQ in the Public Eye

Melissa Terras writes in the introduction to Digital Humanities Quarterly v1 n2 (2007): We at DHQ hope that we will eventually reach a wider audience (and trust our readers will help us do so), introducing the type and range of activities the digital humanities community is interested in, and featuring energetic, novel, and interesting articles on a variety of research, making use of all the Internet technologies at our disposal.…

How to write Consistently Boring Scientific Literature

Kaj Sand-Jensen: Although scientists typically insist that their research is very exciting and adventurous when they talk to laymen and prospective students, the allure of this enthusiasm is too often lost in the predictable, stilted structure and language of their scientific publications. I present here, a top-10 list of recommendations for how to write consistently boring scientific publications. I then discuss why we should and how we could make these…

State of the First Amendment 2007

A 13-page PDF. I wish I could excerpt some of the tables, but I’d have to do a screengrab, and I can’t be bothered this morning. In my “News Writing” class the other day, I had the students take out a piece of paper and write down the names of the five family members from The Simpsons. Then I had them write down the five rights guaranteed by the First…

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Thousands of spiders worked together to build huge web

In Texas, spiders have learned to cooperate. And I, for one, salute our new arachnid overlords. But Tuesday afternoon, thousands of Texas spiders were back at it, working to rebuild an immense spider web at Lake Tawakoni State Park that at one time stretched about 200 yards, covering bushes and trees to create a creepy canopy. Researchers say they now believe thousands of spiders from different species worked together to…