Recovering Journalist: NewspapeRx, Revisited

This list from Mark Potts (of “Recovering Journalist) is just the thing I needed in order to motivate me to ask my students to think of the online version of the paper as the primary product, and the print version a useful offshoot. (At present, the reverse is true.) What would you do if you ran a newspaper? Somebody asked me that question recently, and it made me pull together…

The Burden of the Humanities

Wilfred M. McClay: The humanities are imprecise by their very nature. But that does not mean they are a form of intellectual ­finger-­painting. The knowledge they convey is not a rough, preliminary substitute for what psychology, chemistry, molecular biology, and physics will eventually resolve with greater finality. They are an accurate reflection of the subject they treat, the most accurate possible. In the long run, we cannot do without ­them.…

Person of interest

Language Log has a good post on a phrase that I’ve seen cropping up increasingly in journalism: Person of interest, called a “euphemism for a suspect” by the National Association of Police Chiefs, is now routinely used in investigations of all types, from murders to brush fires.  Donna Shaw, writing in the American Journalism Review two years ago, said: Officially, “persons of interest” means…well, nothing. No one has ever formally…