Malwebolence

The headline writer was having an off day, but the content — a thoughtful examination of the trolling subculture — is excellent. NYT Magazine. In the late 1980s, Internet users adopted the word “troll” to denote someone who intentionally disrupts online communities. Early trolling was relatively innocuous, taking place inside of small, single-topic Usenet groups. The trolls employed what the M.I.T. professor Judith Donath calls a “pseudo-na├»ve” tactic, asking stupid…

3

In New Media Programs, Who Benefits?

In today’s landscape, defining “the media” isn’t nearly as clear-cut as it used to be. Big-name newspapers and networks mingle with cable channels, all-purpose Web sites and blogs in the minds of the average news consumer, and for good reason: They are, in many cases, converging, with widely read blogs run by newspapers and online Web stories originating from cable networks. Meanwhile, a number of relatively new outlets have become…

1

Electronic Hybridity: The Persistent Processes

It was intersting to see online political discourse (with a case study on the Kerry-Edwards attempt to build a blog presence in 2004) and a history of the internet filtered through a folklorist’s lens. I’m saving this in case I need ever need to update some of the insights found in the older, classic, historical studies of cyberculture (such as Buckles’s dissertation on Adventure, or Levy’s Hackers, or Kidder’s The Soul of…