Global Warming: A Tale of Two Writers

While the Church gets a lot of guff for its skeptical responses to Galileo’s astronomical findings, some Jesuit astronomers not only listened to his ideas but repeated his observations, and some university faculty members flatly refused to look through a telescope. Simplistic representations of scientific issues, with heroes and villains, make good stories, but rarely do justice to the science.

Unquestioning media representation of the climate change issue — by journalists who cite environmentalist press releases, or PR writers who’ve sold their souls to the highest bidder — drives me crazy.

Here’s a thoughtful essay that usually places climate change issue in the context of the human search for knowledge, rather than using it as rhetorical cudgel.

Many believe there is solid data
that a great deal of the Earth has been warming slightly over the last
couple decades, but the exact reason why is still unknown.  There’s an
abundance of theory about what might be causing it, but much research
remains to be done.  There also have been telltale signs that there has
been some cooling this year, but again, this needs to be viewed in a
broader context.

In the end, what people need to realize is just because it isn’t the
end of the world doesn’t mean that global warming might not be
happening.  And whether it is or isn’t; understanding and analytically
examining our planet’s climate is an endeavor worth devoting time,
money, and some of the world’s brightest brains to.  Likewise,
“environmental” initiatives like species conservation, land protection,
fuel efficient vehicles, and alternative energy are good ideas with or
without AGW beliefs. 

It’s been an interesting year, and it the coming year to follow, I
suggest that readers following the warming debate take into
consideration both sides of the issue, even if you agree more with one.
Jason Mick