freedomhouse.org: Freedom of the Press > Methodology

From the explanation of a map showing differences in press freedom around the world. We recognize cultural differences, diverse national interests, and varying levels of economic development. Yet Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states: Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive, and impart information and ideas through any media regardless…

Pittsburgh School District Leads Nation In Ability To Spell 'Roethlisberger'

Pittsburgh teachers said that in 2005 they noticed an alarming trend: Students stopped using Roethilsberger’s last name in essays and papers, instead referring to the quarterback by his easy-to-spell nickname, “Big Ben.” That summer, the Pittsburgh school board took action, eliminating various art courses, American history, and Advanced Placement calculus in favor of a rigorous new curriculum focused squarely on getting its students back on track. Instead of taking world…

Patrick Stewart: the legacy of domestic violence

I managed to find my own refuge in acting. The stage was a far safer place for me than anything I had to live through at home – it offered escape. I could be someone else, in another place, in another time. However, whenever the role called for anger, fury, or the expression of murderous impulses, I was always afraid of what I might unleash if I surrendered myself to…

spectacle at Web2.0 Expo… from my perspective

It’s fairly common for speakers at high-tech events to give their talks in front of a screen that displays a Twitter stream. The snarky backchannel compliments a speaker whose goal is to be provocative or entertaining, but what happens when the speaker is aiming for subtlety and complex understanding? Here’s a story of how the backchannel led an experienced speaker to self-combust. The Twitter stream was initially upset that I…

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Guys Still Hog Role of Intellectual Heavy Weight

The space that used to belong only to men grows ever smaller. However, the statistics about who is portrayed in the media as knowledgeable “talking heads,” about who is credited with writing the most influential books and who gets bylines in the most respected intellectual magazines seem to change very little. In a year that saw new books by Margaret Atwood, Louise Erdrich, Alice Munro, Jayne Anne Phillips, Helen Benedict…