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The iPad, the Kindle, and the future of books

The industry’s great hope was that the iPad would bring electronic books to the masses–and help make them profitable. E-books are booming. Although they account for only an estimated three to five per cent of the market, their sales increased a hundred and seventy-seven per cent in 2009, and it was projected that they would eventually account for between twenty-five and fifty per cent of all books sold. But publishers…

Hitler Is Very Upset That Constantin Film Is Taking Down Hitler Parodies

For my money, memes on the Internet don’t get any better than the Hitler one. You know, the one in which you take some current event (the more mundane, the better) and shove it into the scene from the German film Downfall in which Hitler is told in his bunker that he cannot win the war. The key to these (assuming you don’t speak German, of course) is to replace…

In Which Some Infographics Are Presented for Your Appreciation

Compare Graduation Days with this Victorian comparative geography image. I’m not sure the diploma motif of “Graduation Days” works, since there’s nothing on a a diploma that has vertical lines like that. The density of information takes a while to absorb, but other than the pie chart seal, there’s nothing particularly interesting to look at in the image itself, to keep our attention while we try to figure out what…

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Video games can never be art

Roger Ebert expounds upon — but does not reconsider — his rejection of the aesthetic possibilities of the video game. Ebert is prompted to return to the topic because of a talk by Kellee Santiago, who used cave paintings and stills from early black and white movies to argue that just as painting and movies have evolved, video games will evolve too.  Ebert rejects Santiago’s premise that the cave paintings…

The 2010 Lyttle Lytton Contest

“I shouldn’t be saying this, but I think I’ll love you always, baby, always,” Adam cried into the email. –Shexmus Amed The winner from Adam Cadre’s “Lyttle Lytton” contest (an awful-first-line contest, named after the author who famously penned “It was a dark and stormy night”) My favorite was actually: There was only one man salubrious enough to assuage my hunger for love – senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA). –Kevin Sands