Kindle, We Have a Problem: Amazons Pricing Policies Affect Publishers

Amazon’s recently introduced digital “delivery fee,” charging publishers 15 cents per megabyte to transfer a book’s file to the Kindle, has forced some comics publishers to rethink using the Kindle platform. While novels are text-based and unlikely to run up a delivery charge much over $0.02, graphic novels have a much higher bandwidth, and could be forced into a lower payment/royalty rate and higher list price because of their file…

At Seton Hill, Christina Michelmore is about to speak on the Egyptian Revolution.

At Seton Hill, Christina Michelmore is about to speak on the Egyptian Revolution. Packed house at Reeves Theater. #Michelmore 7:00 PM Feb 22nd Michelmore is chair of the History Department at Chatham University. She studies images of Muslims in the Western world. #Michelmore 7:07 PM Feb 22nd Setting up extra chairs for “What’s Happening in Egypt and Why Should We Care?” #Michelmore 7:09 PM Feb 22nd I can’t be inconspicuous…

Trove of Jefferson’s books found in St. Louis | Daily Progress

“It’s significant not only because of the size of the collection and the fact that there could easily be more books that Jefferson owned, but because of what books were found,” said Endrina Tay, librarian for technical services for the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello. “There are architectural books that Jefferson used when designing the pavilions on the Lawn as well as the books that were around Jefferson when he…

Where Have the Good Men Gone? – WSJ.com

Yes, at other points in Western history young people have waited well into their 20s to marry, and yes, office girls and bachelor lawyers have been working and finding amusement in cities for more than a century. But their numbers and their money supply were always relatively small. Today’s pre-adults are a different matter. They are a major demographic event. –via Where Have the Good Men Gone? – WSJ.com.

Ludus Novus » Blog Archive » Fine-Tuned: Being Troy Sterling

I’ve just gotten around to playing “Fine-Tuned,” a 2001 work of interactive fiction by Dennis Jerz. It’s a fun piece about a 1920s dandy with an automobile and an opera singer given a strange job. I’m about halfway through, and the game reportedly ends in a cliffhanger (which is disappointing), but so far I’m impressed at how excellently the game puts me into the heads of its characters. Ludus Novus…