BBC – Editorial Guidelines – Guidance – Social Networking, Microblogs and other Third Party Websites: Personal Use – Summary

The personal use of the internet by BBC staff must be tempered by an awareness of the potential conflicts that may arise.

There should be a clear division between “BBC” pages and “personal” pages.

On Social Networking sites, you should be mindful that the information you disclose does not bring the BBC into disrepute.

For example, editorial staff should not indicate their political allegiance. Non-editorial staff should make their role clear if they wish to engage in political activity.

It may not be appropriate to share BBC-related photographs, comments and videos. Offensive comment about BBC colleagues may be deemed a disciplinary offence.

BBC staff are free to edit online encyclopaedias (such as Wikipedia) but should be transparent about doing so. You may respond to legitimate criticism of the BBC but not remove it.

Blogs, microblogs and other personal websites which do not identify the author as a BBC employee, do not discuss the BBC and are purely personal would fall outside this guidance.

New and existing blogs, microblogs and other personal websites which do identify the author as a BBC employee should be discussed with your line manager to ensure that due impartiality and confidentiality is maintained. –BBC – Editorial Guidelines – Guidance – Social Networking, Microblogs and other Third Party Websites: Personal Use – Summary.