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Kindle Touch converts book addicts to e-book fanatics – Setonian Online

I know what you’re thinking: Why get a Kindle Touch when you already have an iPad, provided graciously by none other than Seton Hill University? That’s simple. The Kindle Touch’s 6” display features the most advanced E Ink Pearl to date. The biggest advantage to E Ink is it’s anti-glare feature. While there will still be some glare depending on how you hold the device in the sunlight, it’s a…

Wireless computing at Seton Hill: “The most connected university I’ve ever seen… Want to see a large-scale, mission-critical installation in action?”

[A]n interview I did with key staff at Seton Hill University in Greensburg, PA, not far from Pittsburgh. This is the most connected university I’ve ever seen – every student, and there are around 2200 of these, gets an iPad and a MacBook (!), and, of course, they bring their own wireless devices to campus as well. Want to see a large-scale, really-mission-critical installation in action? This is it. And…

Open Source Citation Style Language Editor Under Development

The original headline for the press release highlights the names of the two groups doing the work, which is of course flattering to the groups, but far less newsworthy to the public the PR people are supposed to be relating with. “A large amount of researcher time is spent formatting documents, rather than getting on with the creation of great research,” says Ian Mulvany, VP Product at Mendeley. “By working…

Notes on The Death of the Author

Some passages that struck me as I reviewed the influential Roland Barthes essay. [I]n ethnographic societies the responsibility for a narrative is never assumed by a person but by a mediator, shaman or relator whose ‘performance’ — the mastery of the narrative code — may possibly be admired but never his ‘genius’.T he author is a modern figure, a product of our society insofar as…it discovered the prestige of the…

London’s Big Ben is leaning, parliament sinking: reports | Reuters

Note headline; here is the only time this Reuters article refers to the “parliament was slipping into the Thames” issue: [Professor John Burland of Imperial College London] dismissed concern in the media that parliament was slipping into the Thames, while the commission’s spokesman denied the walls around the palace were suffering from a particularly bad subsidence problem causing Big Ben to lean. –via London’s Big Ben is leaning, parliament sinking: reports.…