Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Lesson Plans: Activities Related to Stage Musical & Film — Jerz’s Literacy Weblog

My talented wife wrote this lesson plan, in honor of our local performing arts school (Stage Right! Greensburg)’s production of Joseph this weekend. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice, draws its story from the (Old Testament) book of Genesis: Jacob gives his favorite son, Joseph, a gloriously-colored coat, which incites the jealousy of the other 11 sons.  Eventually, when…

iPad Review: Apple’s Third-Gen iPad May Be the Last One That Matters

An Apple iPad has never looked so awful. No, I’m not referring to the new iPad, the one with the ballyhooed Retina display. I’m referring to last year’s iPad 2, whose screen now looks grainy and pixelated when viewed alongside Apple’s latest tablet. The improvement in display quality smacks you in the face as soon as you compare the two iPad models, and it’s an upgrade that forces a nagging…

The Neuroscience of Your Brain On Fiction

The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated. Keith Oatley, an emeritus professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto (and a published novelist), has proposed that reading produces a vivid simulation of reality, one that “runs on minds of readers just as computer simulations run…

Retracting “Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory” | This American Life

We’re horrified to have let something like this onto public radio. Many dedicated reporters and editors – our friends and colleagues – have worked for years to build the reputation for accuracy and integrity that the journalism on public radio enjoys. It’s trusted by so many people for good reason. Our program adheres to the same journalistic standards as the other national shows, and in this case, we did not…

Culturomics Looks at the Birth and Death of Words

Roughly 30 to 50 years after their birth, they either enter the long-term lexicon or tumble off a cliff into disuse. The authors suggest that this may be because that stretch of decades marks the point when dictionary makers approve or disapprove new candidates for inclusion. Or perhaps it’s generational turnover: Children accept or reject their parents’ coinages. –Culturomics Looks at the Birth and Death of Words – WSJ.com.

‘Google is now an ad company’: Departing exec James Whittaker’s Goldman Sachs-style rant

Whittaker says that CEO Larry Page, who took over the company from Eric Schmidt, had a focus on ‘beating’ Facebook in advertising – which led the company to shift its focus from established products such as Google Mail onto its controversial social network Google Plus and other ‘social’ products built for advertising. –via ‘Google is now an ad company’: Departing exec James Whittaker’s Goldman Sachs-style rant

Making Things in the Digital Humanities

I call what I’m doing “digital humanities” when I shift from treating technologies as objects of inquiry (e.g., a cultural history of magnetic recording) to actually expressing my work through them (e.g., using a platform like Scalar). In this regard, my work is significantly influenced by scholars such as Cheryl Ball, Tara McPherson, and Virginia Kuhn, each of whom is actively involved in “multimodal scholarly communication” (or blending multiple media,…

15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly

Beautiful synergy of word and image. Proofreading errors aren’t always related to “grammar,” and the explanations are not as instructive as I’d like to see. Students who are already unhappy about being in a freshman writing class might not appreciate being told they are fools and goofs, but I’m always looking for ways to make writing lessons more visually appealing. This graphic fits the bill. 15 Grammar Goofs That Make…

Encyclopedia Britannica Halts Print Edition

My parents bought the 1976 edition, which came in a concise Micropedia and a more detailed Macropedia. We owned both. I remember using them to help flesh out last-minute homework assignments, but I have stronger memories of looking up topics like the psychological development of teenagers, acne, puberty, etc. The Encyclopedia Britannica has announced that after 244 years, dozens of editions and more than 7m sets sold, no new editions…