Feature: History Lesson: the treasured past of LucasArts point and clicks

I played more of the Sierra point-and-click adventures than the LucasArts ones, but “The Dig” and “Full Throttle” were probably as important to me as half a dozen of my once-favorite TV shows or movies. (I’ve revisited these games by watching YouTube longplay videos.)

20140216-104528.jpgThere’s a fondness throughout the catalogue for the catalogue. Monkey Island pokes fun at obscure adventure Loom. Indiana Jones props cameo all over the place. Monkey Island hero Guybrush Threepwood’s ability to hold his breath for ten minutes is more talked about outside Monkey Island than in it. As a gamer relishing the gags one by one, you couldn’t help but feel part of a LucasArts club.

If adoration could be converted into cash LucasArts would still be making these games today, but 1995 saw commercial interest drying up. Despite the best intentions of Monkey Islands 3 and 4 and Tim Schafer’s magnificent Grim Fandango, the point ‘n’ click was dead ‘n’ buried. At least for LucasArts. —Feature: History Lesson: the treasured past of LucasArts point and clicks – CVG US.