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A Pedestal, A Table, A Love Letter: Archaeologies of Gender in Videogame History

A thoughtful, informative article on the importance of Roberta Williams, co-founder of Sierra Online (an adventure game titan from the 1980s). Drawing from both media archaeology and feminist cultural studies, this contribution first outlines the function Roberta Williams serves as a gendered subject of game history. The remainder of the essay is organized as three short, non-chronological vignettes about specific objects and practices in the biography of Roberta Williams. Attention…

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One Does Not Simply: An Introduction to the Special Issue on Internet Memes

When we envisioned a journal of visual culture issue on ‘Internet Memes’ over two years ago, we sensed that the best way to be generous to our subject matter was to not presume to know what it would look like. Academic publishing – characterized by its long review periods and labored revision processes – habitually plays tortoise to the internet’s hare. Entire online communities can rise, flourish, and evaporate in…

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Typeset In The Future

While watching classic science fiction films like Alien and 2001: A Space Odyssey, do you find yourself distracted from the plot because you spend so much time studying the typography of the computer displays, the signs in public areas, and whether Ripley’s name really appears in Pump Demi in a nameplate in the main cabin of the Nostromo? No? Well, truth be told, me neither, but fortunately Dave Addey has…

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‘A Klingon Christmas Carol’ Translates Dickens’ Scrooge Fable to ‘Star Trek’ Universe for Fifth Chicago Season

Be still, my nerdy heart. (The other heart can go on beating.) Written by Christopher Kidder-Mostrom and Sasha Warren, A Klingon Christmas Carol is the first play ever to have been performed entirely in the Klingon language. The made-up tongue was developed for the Star Trek universe by Marc Okrand from basic elements created by actor James Doohan (“Scotty”) for the first Trek film, 1979’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture.…

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Saturday morning cartoons are no more

I certainly have fond memories of Saturday morning cartoons, but I can think of scores of things I’d rather my kids do instead of staying at home watching TV all day. I am no TV snob — I love me some Star Trek and with the kids have recently watched Doctor Who and the 1980s BBC Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, but we are in charge of how much…