October 4, 2010 Archives

A quick audio overview of what's due Oct 4 and Oct 6.

Weekly Update Oct 4.mp3

Assigned Text:

Nights with Uncle Remus

Read tales 1 though 8 in Nights with Uncle Remus.

I'm most interested in what you have to say about stories 5 through 8, since I say less about them during the podcast. But you are welcome to chose your quote from any of those stories.

As with all assigned texts, remember to blog a brief quotation, post a link from the course website to your blog, and post 2-4 comments.  Your blog portfolio assignment will also give you the opportunity to show evidence that you can also link from your entry to the course website, to your peers, and to relevant material you find online.  The bare minimum, however, asks simply for a brief quotation and a statement of what you would talk about if called on during class.
The purpose of part 1 of the podcast is to introduce you to the way the Uncle Remus tales represent the African-American dialect. I suggest you listen to the podcast while looking at this web page.
Uncle Remus Podcast Part 1 -- Dialect.mp3 

Part 2 prepares you for the tales we'll be reading for class Wednesday, tales I through VIII of Nights With Uncle Remus.
Uncle Remus Podcast Part 2 -- Nights With Uncle Remus (I through VIII) .mp3

(There are two podcasts, but I am treating them as a single assigned text. You don't need to respond to both separately.)

Text to go along with Part 1 (there is no separate text file to go along with Part 2 of the podcast -- for that, refer to Nights with Uncle Remus itself.)

For your pre-discussion online activity, post your idea for Paper 1 by 5pm Monday (Oct 4).  I will post quick constructive feedback for every item that was posted by the deadline. (And you are welcome to follow up by email.)

Things to think about:

Are you starting with the text, and then using it to support the meaning that you find in a specific passage? (Good!)
Are you starting with an interpretation, and looking for text to support what you already believe? (Not so good!)

Remember your thesis should be about the work, rather than about "people" or "love" or "dreams."

  • People can be closed-minded. One example of closed-minded people are the Puritans in The Scarlet Letter.
    (This is a claim about "people," not about The Scarlet Letter.)
  • Hawthorne uses the flaws of the Puritan community in The Scarlet Letter in order to [do what?]
    (The first part is an observation; to make it a paper topic, you would need a claim that's complex enough that it's worth defending.)
  • Just as the flaws of the Puritan community make Hester into an admirable character, the flaws of Hester as a mother (as Hawthorne describes them) provide Pearl with the independence, strength, and sensitivity that prepare her for her role as a new Romantic heroine.
    (This thesis is about the work, not about the Puritan faith, "people," or "motherhood." You can see what structure the paper would take -- one brief section on how Hester is shaped by the Puritan community, another brief section on Hester's weaknesses as a mother, and then longer sections on independence, strength, and sensitivity, and a conclusion that argues Pearl is a romantic heroine.)

Recent Comments

Cassie Ellson on John Henry (Ballad): http://blogs.setonhill.edu/cas
Cassie Ellson on From Sunup to Sundown: http://blogs.setonhill.edu/cas
Cassie Ellson on Nights with Uncle Remus: http://blogs.setonhill.edu/cas
Cassie Ellson on Nights with Uncle Remus: Response to Alexi's blog (comm
Patrick Schober on Blog Portfolio 2: blog number 2 http://blogs.set
Cassie Ellson on The Black Cat: Also tried to comment on Mary
Cassie Ellson on The Black Cat: http://blogs.setonhill.edu/cas
Cassie Ellson on Why I Wrote "The Yellow Wallpaper": This is my response to Stefani
Cassie Ellson on Why I Wrote "The Yellow Wallpaper": http://blogs.setonhill.edu/cas
Cassie Ellson on The Yellow Wallpaper: http://blogs.setonhill.edu/cas
August
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31        
September
      01 2 3 4
5 06 07 08 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30    
October
          1 2
3 04 5 06 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31            
November
  01 2 03 4 5 6
7 08 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30        
December
      01 2 3 4
5 06 7 08 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31