08 Feb 2008 [ Prev | Next ]

Short Story Tips

http://jerz.setonhill.edu/writing/creative/shortstory/


For homework, blog your agenda item as you would for any reading assignment. Come to class prepared to workshop some scenarios for your short story that is due Monday.  You are welcome to use your blog to start developing your ideas for your story.

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Stephanie Wytovich said:

"The crisis may be a recognition, a decision, or a resolution. The character understands what hasn't been seen before, or realizes what must be done, or finally decides to do it. It's when the worm turns. Timing is crucial. If the crisis occurs too early, readers will expect still another turning point. If it occurs too late, readers will get impatient--the character will seem rather thick. -Jerome Stern"

To read more about my views on the turning point of a story, progress to:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/StephanieWytovich/2008/02/the_makings_of_a_living_breath.html

"Why would your reader bother to think about what is going on, if the author carefully explains what each and every line means?" ("Short Story Tips").

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/EthanShepley/2008/02/why_ask_a_question_that_alread.html

"In order to develop a living, breathing, multi faceted character, it is important to know way more about the character than you will ever use in the story" (Short Stories:10 Tips for Novice Creative Writers).

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/AngelaPalumbo/2008/02/you_dont_need_to_hear_about_th.html

Greta Carroll said:

“A plot is a series of events deliberately arranged so as to reveal their dramatic, thematic, and emotional significance" (Jane Burroway, "Short Story Tips").
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/GretaCarroll/2008/02/keeping_those_words_under_cont.html

"Conflict is the fundamental element of fiction, fundamental because in literature only trouble is interesting. It takes trouble to turn the great themes of life into a story: birth, love, sex, work, and death. -Janet Burroway" (Short Story Tips)

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessieFarine/2008/02/birth_love_sex_work_death.html

Erica Gearhart said:

Visit the link below to view my comments on "Short Stories: 10 Tips for Novice Creative Writers" and character development.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/EricaGearhart/2008/02/showing_in_short_stories.html

marsha banton said:

Your reader probably won't need to know much ,more than the most important things in four areas.
Appearance, give the reader a visual understanding of the charcter.
Action, Describe the character with actions.
Speech, Develop your character as a prson.
Thought, Bring yje reader into your character's mind, to show them your character's unexpressed memories, fears, and hopes. Short Story Tips p-4
marsha banton

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KayleyDardano/2008/02/short_story_development.html

Developing Characters
“Your job, as a writer of short fiction--whatever your beliefs--is to put complex personalities on stage and let them strut and fret their brief hour. Perhaps the sound and fury they make will signify something that has more than passing value--that will, in Chekhov's words, "make [man] see what he is like." -Rick Demarnus”

Brendan's eyes looked away from the priest and up to the mountains,"

Kaitlin Monier said:

"If you are having trouble getting started, look out the window. The whole world is a story, and every moment is a miracle."

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KaitlinMonier/2008/02/stories_of_trains_hospitals_an.html

Jeanine O'Neal said:

“Conflict is the fundamental element of fiction, fundamental because in literature only trouble is interesting. It takes trouble to turn the great themes of life into a story: birth, love, sex, work, and death.” -Janet Burroway (Short Story Tips)

View more of my blog at:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JeanineONeal/2008/02/the_trouble_with_only_literatu.html

“Plot is what happens, the storyline, the action. Jerome Stern says it is how you set up the situation, where the turning points of the story are, and what the characters do at the end of the story.”

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/AngelicaGuzzo/2008/02/short_story_gold.html

Deana Kubat said:

Jane Burroway says that the crisis "must always be presented as a scene. It is "the moment" the reader has been waiting for. In Cinderella's case, "the payoff is when the slipper fits." (10 tips)

Ally Hall said:

"'If you are having trouble getting started, look out the window. The whole world is a story, and every moment is a miracle.'
-Bruce Taylor, UWEC Professor of Creative Writing"

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/AllisonHall/2008/02/document_what_you_can_see_on_p.html

Stephanie Wytovich said:

Looking for a club/organization to add to your resume? English club is looking for members!

visit my blog for more information:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/StephanieWytovich/2008/02/dear_english_fans.html

"In order to develop a living, breathing, multi-faceted character, it is important to know way more about the character than you will ever use in the story" (Short Stories: 10 Tips for Novice Creative Writers Section 3: Developing Characters).

You can read the rest of my agenda item here:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/LaurenMiller/2008/02/in_order_to_develop_a.html

Richelle Dodaro said:

"In today's fast-moving world, the first sentence of your short story should catch your reader's attention with the unusual, the unexpected, an action, or a conflict. Begin with tension and immediacy. Remember that short stories need to start close to their end."

Katie Vann said:

"Keep a notebook. To R.V. Cassill, notebooks are "incubators", a place to begin with overheard conversation, expressive phrases, images, ideas, and interpretations on the world around you." (Kennedy)

Juliana Cox said:

"Keep a notebook. To R. V. Cassill, notebooks are 'incubators,' a place to begin with overheard conversation, expressive phrases, images, ideas, and interpretations on the world around you" (Short Story Tips, Getting Started).

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JulianaCox/2008/02/secure_my_ideas.html

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Juliana Cox on Short Story Tips: "Keep a notebook. To R. V. Cassill, notebooks are
Katie Vann on Short Story Tips: "Keep a notebook. To R.V. Cassill, notebooks are "
Richelle Dodaro on Short Story Tips: "In today's fast-moving world, the first sentence
Tiffany Gilbert on Short Story Tips: http://blogs.setonhill.edu/TiffanyGilbert/2008/02/
Lauren Miller on Short Story Tips: "In order to develop a living, breathing, multi-fa
Stephanie Wytovich on Short Story Tips: Looking for a club/organization to add to your res
Ally Hall on Short Story Tips: "'If you are having trouble getting started, look
Deana Kubat on Short Story Tips: Jane Burroway says that the crisis "must always be
Angelica Guzzo on Short Story Tips: “Plot is what happens, the storyline, the action.
Jeanine O'Neal on Short Story Tips: “Conflict is the fundamental element of fiction, f
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