Journalism 101: I fixed this meme for you.

I can sympathize with the sentiment, but this meme is not how I’d frame the situation. When two sources disagree, assuming that one must be right and the other must be wrong is a form of bias. What if one source is in New York and the other is in Santa Fe, and you are in Ohio? Would looking out your own window be enough? Both sources could be wrong,…

Facebook logo (white sans-serif lowercase letter "f" on a blue background).

Facebook touts fight on fake news, but struggles to explain why InfoWars isn’t banned

10 points to CNN’s Oliver Darcy for working both “when asked about” and “this reporter” into a news story that was not written by a supporting character in a 1940s gangster flick. When asked by this reporter how the company could claim it was serious about tackling the problem of misinformation online while simultaneously allowing InfoWars to maintain a page with nearly one million followers on its website, Hegeman said…

Screen shot of a Globe and Mail news article that uses an anonymous source, with an expandable inline explanation of how and why journalists use anonymous sources.

Canada’s Globe and Mail Uses Expandable Inline Meta-articles to Explain Its Coverage

Journalism matters. Educated citizens who understand and appreciate the role of the free press in a democracy are a threat to authoritarian figures who benefit by sowing mistrust. It’s perfectly reasonable to point out errors and bias in specific news stories. (News organizations love reporting about when their competitors get a story wrong, and journalists are regularly disciplined or ousted for egregious mistakes.)  It’s hardly constructive to use the errors…

A tiny crying toddler and Donald J. Trump share the cover of the July 2 Time Magazine.
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The crying Honduran girl on the cover of Time was not separated from her mother, father says

The original was a stunning image, which has been used to criticize ICE’s policy of separating children from parents attempting to immigrate at the border — a policy which Trump says he dislikes. The animated version of the Time cover makes it clear that this is a composite picture, though of course the emotional power of the juxtaposition is exactly what the cover is shooting for. Journalists love reporting when…