Muslims speak out against NPR's political correctness

While
a Muslim advocacy group, the Council on American Islamic Relations
(CAIR), was instrumental in getting National Public Radio (NPR) to fire Juan Williams, some Muslims are speaking out against succumbing to the censorship of political correctness. —Caroline May, The Daily Caller

“But it’s just Facebook gossip,” my students sometimes say — even my
journalism students — when I point out the rules of libel, defamation,
and common courtesy apply everywhere, all the time, for anyone who plans
a career in the media. Should Juan Williams have been fired by NPR for
saying he feels uncomfortable when he’s on a plane with people wearing
traditional Muslim attire? Williams himself said that NPR was simply
using this as an excuse, and FOX promptly offered Williams a $2 million
annual contract, so I don’t weep for Williams. Still, NPR — which
prides itself on presenting more in-depth stories — seems just a tad
overhasty for firing Williams so quickly, when it could have pulled him
off the air, called a few meetings, and then released a
carefully-crafted, pro-active statement explaining its decision.