Testing

I’ve been having some problems with the WordPress iOS app. Just testing. This should be a robot inspecting a donut.

Online Trolls Losing Anonymity

The Internet has become a Wild West of hooligans apt to besmirch the name of anybody they don’t like, because they think they can get away with it under a cloak of anonymity, legal experts say. “The real difficulties you are going to have is finding who are the John Does who are posting this stuff,” said Frank Snyder, a law professor at Texas Wesleyan University in Fort Worth. Indeed,…

Should We Really Abolish the Term Paper? A Response to the NYT

Students learn to evaluate one another’s thinking and challenge one another–and, far more important, they learn from one another and correct themselves. I cannot think of a better skill to take out into the world. By blogging and responding to one another’s posts, my students aren’t learning how to write for an English professor. They are learning how to write for the world they are about to enter, in their…

Blogs vs. Term Papers

While I’m not quite ready to ditch the traditional term paper, students in most of my classes use blogs for brainstorming, prewriting, reflection, and synthesis; I encourage students to post new media artifacts as part of a “creative criticall presentation” in lit and media classes. For freshman writing, I stick fairly closely to a shared syllabus that does not make new media composition a core part of any assignent (though,…

You Be The Judge: Are Bloggers Journalists? – Forbes

On page 9 of a 13-page ruling, Judge Hernandez last month set out these requirements to qualify as a journalist: Education in journalism. Credentials or proof of affiliation with a recognized news entity Proof of adherence to journalistic standards such as editing, fact-checking, or disclosures of conflicts of interest Keeping notes of conversations and interviews conducted Mutual understanding or agreement of confidentiality between the defendant and his/her sources Creation of…

Instructional Blogging: Promoting Interactivity, Student-Centered Learning, and Peer Input

Stuart Glogoff wrote up his experiences teaching with blogs. The article is from 2005, and its main usefulness for me is that it validates some of my own practices — giving students individual blogs, requiring students to read and comment in peer blogs, and acknowledging that students will quickly abandon their blogs if they feel nobody (including the instructor) is reading them. As a valuable e-learning tool, blogging can be…