Punctuation errors can cost jobs, money, esteem

It’s a safe bet none of the world leaders meeting Thursday for the
first day of the G-20 summit are aware that it’s also National
Punctuation Day. Rubin founded it in 2004 after he got fed up with
seeing misplaced apostrophes and other transgressions by people who
should know better — newspaper reporters and editors, book publishers
and billboard advertisers.

“No one cares,” he says. “That’s my pet peeve, that a lot of people
who are doing this don’t care. Where’s their pride? Where’s their
self-esteem? Where’s their drive to get it right?”

Falling on Sept. 24, National Punctuation Day promotes literacy by
encouraging schools and businesses to conduct activities, programs,
games or contests related to the almighty comma, period and apostrophe.
It’s listed in two directories published by McGraw Hill, “Chases
Calendar of Events” and “The Teacher’s Calendar.”

Rubin also created a Web site, www.nationalpunctuationday.com, which lists the proper usage of punctuation marks and invites visitors to post photos of incorrect road or restaurant signs. —William Loeffler, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

This is a rather weak example of tying a local story to an international news event, but I do enjoy obsessing about the details of language.

Thanks for the link, Mike.