Employers unhappy with new generation of workers

Show up, prepared and on time, not just when you feel like it. Take directions gratefully — and this means not being offended if you’re corrected in public. Knowing a particular skill or craft is not as important as knowing how to learn new things — and that means a willingness to step out of your comfort zone, into a scary new place where there is no step-by-step YouTube tutorial that provides you with the correct answers to spit back on a quiz.

The article is from Australia, so your mileage may vary when extrapolating its claims elsewhere.

“A number of our members consistently tell us they’re seeing students come out of university or training programs and they might have the academic or theoretical skills, but no skills to work at all. It makes them really hard to employ,” [Australia Chamber of Commerce and Industry CEO Kate Carnell] says.“General issues are not understanding that a job is about turning up on time every day, not just when you feel like, that it’s about taking direction, and basic things like you’ve got to be well presented and you’ve got to be pleasant…” | Ms Carnell says the declining need for kids to work is a symptom of a largely more affluent society, and while it offers young people the luxury of focusing on their studies, it also deprives them of the skills they will pick up in the work force before they take up a full time role. —news.com.au