Journalism

Jerz > Writing > Journalism

This page highlights handouts that emphasize the traditional writing skills that have long been a part of journalism.

A 21st-century journalist should of course develop strengths in modern writing skills, such as

News CRAFT: Clear, Relevant, Accurate, Fair, Timely

But those important new media skills will be of little use to writers who haven’t mastered the basics of the news writing craft. Good journalism is clear, relevant, accurate, fair, and timely.

Some basic concepts:

  • What is Newsworthy? (9 min audio)
  • Objectivity: Traditional journalism reports fairly from all sides of an issue — even the side the reporter thinks is wrong.
  • The Inverted Pyramid: Start with whatever is most newsworthy, and taper off. A traditional news story does not build to a climax — it gives away the ending (who won the game, when Route 30 will reopen, what happened at the board meeting) in the very first sentence.
  • Conflict of Interest: If you or a close relative are in a club or on a team, then you can’t write a news story on it. (You might write an editorial, or a column, as long as you disclose your relationship to the subject.)

News Story vs. English Essay
Your English instructor carefully reads your essay to evaluate the depth of your knowledge, the breadth of your vocabulary, and the loftiness of your ideas. Joe Sixpack glances quickly at your news story to learn who won the game, or when Route 30 will reopen, or what happened at the school board meeting last night. What counts as “good writing” depends on what the reader values.

See also this New York Times lesson plan on hard news vs. news features.

Quotations: Using Them Effectively in Journalism
Use direct quotations to record the opinions, emotions, and unique expressions of your sources.  Let the direct words of your sources do as much work as possible, keeping yourself out of the story, and keeping transitions and explanations to a minimum. Use a phrase like “When asked about…” only when omitting it will create a false impression.

Feature Writing: The Invisible Observer
Traditional journalists are invisible observers who stay completely out of the picture, relying on factual observations and quotations from officials, participants, and witnesses do as much of the work as possible.

Hard News Story (Kurtzman and Jerz)
Write so the the reader can stop reading at any time and still come away with the whole story.  There is no need to put a conclusion on a news story; each story ends whenever the individual reader has had enough. Journalists write so that editors could chop off paragraphs from the bottom of the story at any time.

News Feature Analysis
A news feature tells a story at a slightly more relaxed pace than a hard news story. The content of the news feature is usually human interest rather than breaking news.


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  1. Pingback: Updated Journalism Handouts — Jerz's Literacy Weblog

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