image
2

Adventure | T.M. Camp

Great story of nerdiness and discovery and friendship, focusing on the author’s adult memories of his love for a particular text adventure game at a crucial phase of his youth. I’ve collected several such stories in “Interactive Fiction Reflection and Nostalgia.” He knew the game, practically had it memorized. He would be the computer. I would be the player.

Screen Shot 2015-04-14 at 5.11.43 PM
3

All of Your Co-Workers are Gone: Story, Substance, and the Empathic Puzzler

However, running parallel to the evolution of these [graphic] games was a family of explicitly, un- ashamedly narrative titles. Colossal Cave Adventure (Crowther & Woods, 1977), Zork I (1980), and Adventureland (Andventure International, 1978) have equal importance in the evolution of video games, but rarely receive the same kind of general, mainstream popular cultural appreciation as their graphical rivals. These games focused almost entirely on the story and the characters…

Screen Shot 2015-03-28 at 11.35.24 AM
5

Airport retro video games collect spare coins in Sweden

Fliers arriving at Swedens two biggest airports, Stockholm Arlanda and Goteborg Landvetter, can now kill time while waiting for their luggage by playing video game classics “Ms. Pac-Man,” “Space Invaders” and “Galaga.”Best of all, the machines in the “Charity Arcade” are custom-made to take coins of any currency, whether its yen, euro or pounds, and all the money is donated to the Swedish Red Cross. —CNN.com.

image

You have 20 minutes before the sun blows up

This charming game focuses on exploring a wonder-filled solar system. The first time I found myself engulfed in the searing light of a collapsed star, I felt confused. Did I do something wrong? Was this the cosmic punishment for the hubris of reaching for the stars? But instead of dying, I found myself right back where I started, standing in front of a campfire 20 minutes before the end of…

Screen Shot 2015-03-22 at 6.13.08 PM
3

George Stone Credits Scott Adams Adventure Games for Inspiring “Max Headroom”

Scott Adams (creator of “Adventureland,” the first commercial home computer game) just posted this on his Facebook page: Hey Scott, Something you may not be aware of is the seminal role you played in the genesis of Max Headroom. There was a TRS80 at my place of work. When folks went home a few of us would stay for a few hours and try to figure out what to do…